Eugene L Melchoir ’49

silver-star


Eugene L. Melchoir
Class of 1949
2nd Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, USAFE

Silver Star for conspicuous gallantry in action near Suncheon, Korea. While proceeding along the main supply route to Suncheon, Korea. Elements of the 2nd Battalion were fired upon by a well dug-in-in reinforced regiment. Company G, the Korean platoon, moved out commanded by Lt. Melchoir. They immediately encountered a hazardous barrage of enemy mortar, automatic weapons and small arms fire, inflicting significant causalities. Being unable to speak the Korean language, Lt. Melchoir successfully overcame the language barrier by constantly exposing himself to the deadly fire of the enemy to indicate to his men their mission, and while directing their fire by using hand and arm signals. During this action, Lt. Melchoir was wounded in both legs but still courageously continued to direct his platoon until he was evacuated. His selfless and courageous actions prevented a well-planned ambush from inflicting higher losses on his platoon and disrupting the mission.

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Thomas R. Childers, Jr. ’69

Bronze-Star-with-V

Thomas R. Childers, Jr.

Thomas R. Childers, Jr.
Class of 1969
Third Battalion, Fourth Marines, First Marine Division, FMF Pacific

Bronze Star w/Valor for valorous actions and meritorious service in combat as a platoon leader and rifle company commander while conducting numerous night ambushes and other direct engagements with the enemy. In each of these actions, Lt. Childers exhibited courage under fire, composure, resourcefulness and disregard for his own safety to protect the lives of his Marines and accomplish the mission. Frequently, he retrieved wounded Marines from hot kill zones, pursued retreating enemy personnel, and motivated leadership by moving under fire to various positions to solidified and coordinate action essential to mission’s accomplishment.

Percival G. Lowe 1883

JPercival G. Lowe
Class of 1883
18th Infantry, Seminole Negro-Indian Scouts

Siler Lifesaving Medal for heroism in rescuing a Seminole Negro-Indian scout from drowning in the Pecos River, near Eagle Nest, Texas.

Robert R. Stewart ’68

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Robert R. Stewart

Robert R. Stewart
Class of 1968
6th Battalion, 31st Infantry, 9th Infantry Division, USARV

Bronze Star w/Valor for heroism while serving as a platoon leader during a night combat operation against a numerically superior enemy force. 1LT Stewart exposed himself to heavy small arms and automatic weapons fire upon contacting an entrenched enemy force, enabling him to direct the actions of his men and orchestrate the delivery of indirect fire and gunships. The effect of sound maneuver and well placed fires routed the enemy force and inflicted heavy casualties. 1LT Stewart’s actions were instrumental to the successful outcome of this engagement.

Richard L. Clark ’68

Richard L. Clark

Richard L. Clark
Class of 1968
1st Infantry Brigade, 5th Infantry Division (Mechanized), USARV

Army Commendation Medal w/V for heroism when his platoon was attacked by a well-equipped and determined company of North Vietnamese regulars. Lt. Clark directed retaliatory fire to each member of his platoon and then, under heavy fire, attempted to recover the body of a mortally wounded armored personnel driver. His courageous efforts kept casualties low and were a significant contribution to the defeat of the enemy.

John L. Sparks, 1861

John L. Sparks

John L. Sparks
Class of 1861
Company K, 1st Regiment, 1st Delaware Infantry Volunteers

Brigadier General Thomas A. Smyth of the 1st Regiment, Delaware Volunteers, wrote of the “bravery and conduct under heavy pressure” of Captain Sparks during the Battle of Chancellorsville. In October, after reorganizing a group of stragglers along Turkey Creek, near Bristoe Station, BG Smyth again wrote of the cool conduct and meritorious service of Captain Sparks.

The Medal of Honor was first authorized in 1861. It was the only medal awarded to soldiers for “gallantry and intrepidity” during the Civil War. Other acts of unmistaken gallantry were only recognized in the dispatches of unit commanders.

Michael R. Sullivan ’67

silver-star

Michael R. Sullivan

Michael R. Sullivan
Class of 1967
2nd Battalion, 14th Infantry, 25th Infantry Division, USARV

Silver Star for heroic action while on a reconnaissance mission in Vietnam. When his company came under attack from an enemy of unknown size, 1st Lt Sullivan acted swiftly. Despite heavy enemy fire he placed his men in strategic fighting positions. Sullivan was wounded as he positioned his men and directed suppressive fire on the enemy, allowing for his unit to withdraw and regroup. Being wounded a second time, he was forced to accept medical help and evacuation.

John C. Everson ’67

Bronze-Star-with-V
John C. Everson

John C. Everson

John C. Everson
Class of 1967
1st Battalion, 11th Infantry, 5th Infantry Division (Mechanized), USARV

Bronze Star w/Valor for valorous actions. While commanding B Company, 1-11th Infantry during contact with an North Vietnamese force inside the DMZ, LT Everson’s unit sustained numerous casualties. After having evacuated the wounded, 1st Platoon discovered that its point man was unaccounted for and presumed KIA. In order to determine the young rifleman’s status and recover him, LT Everson moved 300 meters outside the company perimeter through the enemy automatic weapons kill zone to locate him. Though he located the body, it was too close to the enemy bunkers to recover it that night. The next morning the body was recovered during the morning’s sweep of the position.

Wesley B. Shull ’52

Bronze-Star-with-V
Wesley B. Shull

Wesley B. Shull

Wesley Shull
Class of 1952
Advisory Team, Vietnamese Airborne Brigade USMACV

Bronze Star for heroism

William J. Wolfgram ’43

Bronze-Star-with-V

William J. Wolfgram
Class of 1943
3rd Battalion, 87th Regiment, 10th Mountain Division, Fifth Army, USAFE

Bronze Star w/Valor For heroism during an assault of an enemy held mountain peak near Mt. Della Vedetta, Italy in 1945. 2nd Lieutenant Wolfgram commanded the lead platoon of L Company and remained with the most forward units. They moved forward so aggressively and rapidly in the face of withering enemy fire, that no resistance was able to serious delay this advance. During the attack, Wolfgram continually inspired his men and risked his life on numerous occasions as he coordinated and directed his men.

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